2010 and 2011 are unique years, truly. Well, any ’10’ and ’11’ years are, but I doubt I, readers, or this blog, will be around to see 2110 or 2111. Why are they so special? They’re the years of binary days! The months of January, October, and November in 2010 and 2011 have days where every digit of the date is a 1 or a 0. These can be converted to decimal as they stand; but some of the fun comes in converting from binary to ASCII – American Standard Code for Information Interchange. By adding a leading zero, we can take the two-digit dates and look at them in all three formats. Here’s a table of all the binary days for you to enjoy!

23

Date Binary Adjustment Decimal Equivalent ASCII Character Equivalent
01/01/10 0010110 22 Ctrl+V (SYN command; now used as ‘Paste’)
01/10/10 0011010 26 Ctrl+Z (SUB command; now used as ‘Undo’)
01/11/10 0011110 30 Ctrl+^ (RS command; used in AS/400 systems)
10/01/10 0100110 38 ‘&’ (Ampersand)
10/10/10 0101010 42 ‘*’ (Asterisk)
10/11/10 0101110 46 ‘.’ (Period)
11/01/10 0110110 54 ‘6’ (The six digit)
11/10/10 0111010 58 ‘:’ (Colon)
11/11/10 0111110 62 ‘>’ (‘Greater Than’ sign)
01/01/11 0010111 23 Ctrl+W (ETB command; used in AS/400 systems)
01/10/11 0011011 27 Ctrl+] (ESC command; now accessed from the Escape key)
01/11/11 0011111 31 Ctrl+_ (US command; used in AS/400 systems)
10/01/11 0100111 39 ”’ (Single quote)
10/10/11 0101011 43 ‘+’ (Plus sign)
10/11/11 0101111 47 ‘/’ (Forward slash)
11/01/11 0110111 55 ‘7’ (Seven digit)
11/10/11 0111011 59 ‘;’ (Semicolon)
11/11/11 0111111 63 ‘?’ (Question Mark)
Advertisements